cyberkrunk labs

Things are humming along, and the bf album release is getting nearer. Maybe this year.

The labs have had a major influx of new gear of the past year. The most recent addition is a pair of Dynaudio BM 6A mk II nearfield monitors. Now, back in the day, many happy hours were spent in the depths of UTEMS in front of a pair of Genelec 1030as, which have served as my high water mark for nearfields ever since.

Well, let’s just say that Denmark is not too far from Finland: the Dynaudios are a perfect match for my space, I absolutely love listening to them. They are small, but the bass is accurate and the imaging and detail are bang on.

“Pusherman” just came on iTunes, and the sound of Curtis in my head is what prompted the post.

An unlikely turn of events

I’m having dinner the other night at Emma’s Pizza in Cambridge, Ma. Funny place, college hangout featuring thin-crust pizza, mis-matched chairs, and the geekiest collage of 20-something nerds (everyone of them paying by credit card) I had seen in a long time. The service has been described as “Kafka-esque”–it’s not, it’s just incompetent, but pleasant enough for being so. The service gave me plenty of time to listen to the tunes they were playing, which were pretty good. The first tune that really caught my ear was one I had heard before, but I had no idea what it was. I thought maybe it was some remix of a 60s tune. It had this great refrain of “no, no, no”, sung way behind the beat. Who is this? I Googled on my Blackerry, “Who sings that song that goes no, no, no?” What an age we live in. A few hits down, Google confirmed what I had sort of suspected, it’s the Amy Winehouse song, “Rehab”.

Now, I had seen pictures of Amy–who hasn’t?–and heard about all the brouhaha about her Grammy wins. Let’s just say, I was not predisposed to like her. The music, however, completely won me over, and the CD was waiting for me when I got home Friday night. Dipping into the rest of the album, there are some fine moments and at least a few insanely great lyrics, “What kind of fuckery is this / you made me miss the Slick Rick gig!”

I don’t know if it’s a function of our age or my age, but derivative pop music no longer bothers me, I actually really like it. My favorite bands of the last few years would have had me sneering back in my teens: Interpol is a Joy Division ripoff, the Yeah Yeah Yeahs rip everybody off, The Whigs singer in the post below is an amalgam of Neil Young and Thurston Moore. So What? As Donald “Duck” Dunn famously said, “If the shit fits, wear it!”

Sex Pistols on Ferguson

The performance was as great as the previous night’s gig was lame. Due in large part, no doubt, to the friendlier environment. Lydon is no Leno fan either, apparently, as he revealed in a fun interview alongside a flu-ridden Steve Jones. The band looked good (even Glenn), Lydon was appropriately ridiculous, and fat is the new slim.

Sex Pistols on Leno

Managed to sit through the last 30 minutes of Leno, a personal record, to catch the Pistols. Apparently, the band is back promo-ing their appearance on the latest edition of “Guitar Hero” a video game for kids who would rather not practice pentatonic scales. They ran through “Anarchy in the UK”. Jones flubbed his solo, Lydon couldn’t remember when to interject “In the City!”, so did it three times just to be safe. Cook was fine, and the big news is, Glenn Matlock–the Brian Jones of the Sex Pistols– is back on bass. Matlock, you may recall, always cringed at the forced rhyme of “anti-Christ” and anarchist”. Then again, he washed his feet excessively, so we’re none of us perfect. Lydon did ask “when are we getting out of Iraq?” but was otherwise tame. He had none of the sneering misanthropy evinced in, say, the interview he did way back when with the recently late Tom Snyder. God knows Leno deserves to be on theĀ  receiving end of that sneer more than Snyder ever did.

Lightning Struck Itself: Television at SummerStage

Strange to have been so excited about seeing a band so notoriously aloof and disconnected from their audience. But the truth is, the disconnection is all surface, not quite masking the real connection, through the music. Carnegie Hall might have been a more appropriate venue. When a chamber group is playing, no one remarks how the band tends to look off in the distance while playing, or how they don’t shout slogans at the audience between songs (“Hey Amsterdam! Yeah — I always heard that Concertgebouw audiences are the best chamber audiences in the world!”). Tom Verlaine crouched down, hiding himself behind his stage monitor, to tune his guitar after every song. He was switching between standard and drop D tunings fairly often, so this wasn’t entirely artifice, but still, this is a man who clearly does not revel in being on stage. At 57, he seems to have finally grown into himself. His attitude must have seemed a little bizarre when he was in his twenties, but now he has a David-Carradine-like stature. The set was not craven pandering, either. Long, jammy tunes, including some newer stuff, leaving off some of the great songs of Marquee Moon–no “See No Evil”, “Friction” or “Elevation”. And the finale, their legendary debut album title track, was awesome, especially the moments after the climax where Verlaine veered off into an improvised ending, leaving his bandmates completely bewildered (I was at the front and saw the look of terror of Fred Smith and Billy Ficca’s faces). Patti Smith, off to the side of the stage smiled approvingly.

Television concerts are, these days, rare events. They have been playing together once a year or so for the last few years. This concert, however, was to hold a special significance: the last Television show ever. So wrote Richard Lloyd on his web site:

After the possible Summer stage show in New York City on June 16, which is to be announced by the city of New York on May 15, Richard Lloyd will, after 34 years, be amicably severing all ties with the band Television, in order that he may concentrate his magnetic force and supernatural energies upon his own career in support of his forthcoming record, due out in the fall[…] To the fans of Television, from the very first show at the townhouse Theatre on March 4, 1974 till the hopeful last show here in New York at the Summer stage — which by the way, is a free show, thank you for your support over these many years. I hope to see you follow both my own and the other members of the band in their own solo efforts for many more years to come.

But it was not to be. Lloyd has recently been in intensive care with pneumonia, is still in hospital and could not make the concert. Do we get a do-over?

Opening for Television were Dragons of Zynth (crazy) and Apples in Stereo (ba-hor-rah-hing).

Lines of the Millennium

From someone who didn’t live to see it:

We got have peace
To keep the world alive
And war to cease.

We got to have joy,
True in our hearts
With strength we can’t destroy.

People please hear us
Through our voice the world knows
There’s no choice.

We’re begging save the children
The little ones
Who just don’t understand
Give them a chance
To breed their young
And help purify the land

People please hear us (people please hear us)
Through our voice the world knows
There’s no choice.

And the people in the neighbourhood,
Who would if they only could,
Meet and shake the other’s hand,
Work together for the good of the land.
Give us all an equal chance,
It could be such a sweet romance.

And the soldiers who are dead and gone,
If only we could bring back one,
He’d say “We’ve got to have peace”
To keep the world alive
And war to cease

We got to have joy
True in our hearts
With strength we can’t destroy

People please hear us (people please hear us)
Through our voice the world knows
There’s no choice

And the people in the neighbourhood
Who would if they only could
Meet and shake the other’s hand
Work together for the good of the land
Give us all an equal chance
It could be such a sweet romance

And the soldiers who are dead and gone
If only we could bring back one
He’d say “We’ve got to have peace”
Aah – hah, we got to have peace. Let Let the world know it
Peace, peace, peace
Aah – hah, we got to have peace

People please hear us (people please hear us)
Through our voice the world knows
There’s no choice

Save the children
Save the children
Save the children

And the people in the neighbourhood
Who would if they only could
Meet and shake the other’s hand
Work together for the good of the land
Give us all an equal chance
It could be such a sweet romance

And the soldiers who are dead and gone
If only we could bring back one
He’d say “We’ve got to have peace”
Lo – rd, we got to have peace

Let the people say it
Peace peace peace

Thank you, Curtis.

New DAWg

Spent the day putting my new Digital Audio Workstation (DAW), Cubase 4, through its paces and you can hear the results yourself. Only took a few hours to get the audio set up to match my studio and learn the basics of looping, audio tracks, MIDI tracks, mix automation, inserts, sends, mixdown, the whole works. I have to say I’m pretty impressed, which is good considering it costs same as a couple of nights at the St. Regis. It should be pretty clear where I pilfered the chord progression, but for bonus points can you name the drum loop?

Do you think it needs more guitar?

ex tenebris

Emerging from what must be one of the all-time longest work jags, maybe two months non-stop. There is one track destined to become a classic on “The Weirdness”, the new Stooges record that completely sums it up: “I’m fried”. Good record all around – could be looser, grittier. But what a huge disappointment “A Weekend in the City”, the new Bloc Party album is! The vocals are all intimate and close miked. The microphone is not this guy’s friend. He sounds much better standing back a few feet and shrieking the way he did throughout Silent Alarm. The songs are all mid tempo, with silly arpeggio riffs that beg to be taken seriously. Just sad. I couldn’t sit through the whole album. Instead, I put “Show Your Bones” back on. I cannot get enough of this record. Yeah Yeah Yeah!