ex tenebris

Emerging from what must be one of the all-time longest work jags, maybe two months non-stop. There is one track destined to become a classic on “The Weirdness”, the new Stooges record that completely sums it up: “I’m fried”. Good record all around – could be looser, grittier. But what a huge disappointment “A Weekend in the City”, the new Bloc Party album is! The vocals are all intimate and close miked. The microphone is not this guy’s friend. He sounds much better standing back a few feet and shrieking the way he did throughout Silent Alarm. The songs are all mid tempo, with silly arpeggio riffs that beg to be taken seriously. Just sad. I couldn’t sit through the whole album. Instead, I put “Show Your Bones” back on. I cannot get enough of this record. Yeah Yeah Yeah!

3 Replies to “ex tenebris”

  1. Glad you’re back in the land of the living, thinking about real things, like songs.

    Why Almodovar? What do you think?

  2. Not only thinking, as you will see. The first Black Fondu album in 30 years is in the works.

    It just seemed time for an Almodovar retrospective – although we barely got started before the egg lady took off.

  3. But in that way that eggs and women have, she is only gone for a month, is she not? Just enough time to recover from overwork, explore your new workstation, and greet her return with unbounded relief and revitalization.

    Do you know the book “Flickers” by Gilbert Adair? (Gilbert is a promising name for a film essayist: there is also Gilberto Perez, but his thoughtful “The Material Ghost” is not what you need at the moment.)

    Whereas ‘Flickers’ might be. When I read that you travel often, I thought of suggesting it as a hotel bedside book. But though it isn’t unwieldy, it would add to your luggage.

    Now that you are home with just one cat (and DAWg) to warm your extremities, you might consider borrowing it from your local library.

    It is a quintessential bedside book (or pre-bed book)– one short spread of reflection on one film still per year since the birth of cinema — an outlay that rewards and stimulates attention but doesn’t ask too much of it.

    Interesting, and relaxing.

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